‘I Am a Woman in South Sudan’

By CARE Australia November 26, 2014 1 comment

“My grandmother gave birth to my mother from her kitchen. She had just finished preparing the evening meal. She served my grandfather and his friends, walked in to the kitchen and delivered my mother. It was her seventh baby, in all there were ten children.” – Miabek (male) ©Josh Estey/CARE

Peace is rapidly turning into a distant memory for many in South Sudan, and women and girls continue to bear the brunt of close to a year of conflict and humanitarian crisis. Women in South Sudan are strong and determined, they are the backbone of the country, yet they continue to be victims of unacceptable suffering and oppression. South Sudanese women offer hope for a better country and we can do more to make a difference to their lives.

To mark this year’s 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence, CARE International in South Sudan is asking you to reflect on the statement ‘I am a woman in South Sudan.’

Here is a sample of reflections of men and women in South Sudan on who a South Sudanese woman is.

“You asked me where my husband is. He is in Juba, with another wife. If I depend on my husband, my children will have nothing to eat” - Nyanweng. Photo: Josh Estey/CARE
“You asked me where my husband is. He is in Juba, with another wife. If I depend on my husband, my children will have nothing to eat.” – Nyanweng
Photo: Josh Estey/CARE

 

“A South Sudanese woman is strong and tolerant woman who undergoes a lot of suffering from childhood until she becomes a woman and starts taking care of her children. She will always do something even when she struggles to feed and educate her children” - Rachel. Photo: Josh Estey/CARE
“A South Sudanese woman is a strong and tolerant woman who undergoes a lot of suffering from childhood until she becomes a woman and starts taking care of her children. She will always do something even when she struggles to feed and educate her children.” – Aliyah
Photo: Josh Estey/CARE

 

“A woman in South Sudan undergoes difficult times but she still keeps the hope that one day things will be alright. She is a woman of peace and always wants to see that her family and her country are at peace but her voice is not being heard" - Nyarone. Photo: Josh Estey/CARE
“A woman in South Sudan undergoes difficult times but she still keeps the hope that one day things will be alright. She is a woman of peace and always wants to see that her family and her country are at peace but her voice is not being heard.” – Nyarone
Photo: Josh Estey/CARE

 

“Girls of 16 years are married, they are used as a source of wealth. If you are a girl and you want to study, they will not allow you. They will give you to a man who is not your choice and, if you refuse, they will beat you” - Mary. Photo: Josh Estey/CARE
“Girls of 16 years are married, they are used as a source of wealth. If you are a girl and you want to study, they will not allow you. They will give you to a man who is not your choice and, if you refuse, they will beat you.” – Leyla
Photo: Josh Estey/CARE

 

“We men are the problem. We behave like politicians afraid to lose our power when we know others can do better” - Geoffrey. Photo: Josh Estey/CARE
“We men are the problem. We behave like politicians afraid to lose our power when we know others can do better.” – Omari
Photo: Josh Estey/CARE

 

“My grandmother gave birth to my mother from her kitchen. She had just finished preparing the evening meal. She served my grandfather and his friends, walked in to the kitchen and delivered my mother. It was her seventh baby, in all there were ten children.” - Miabek. Photo: Josh Estey/CARE
“My grandmother gave birth to my mother from her kitchen. She had just finished preparing the evening meal. She served my grandfather and his friends, walked into the kitchen and delivered my mother. It was her seventh baby, in all, there were ten children.” – Kasim 
Photo: Josh Estey/CARE

 

“I think about struggle, injustice, violence and hunger. I also imagine many children whose lives are dependent on the welfare of their mothers. I then think about how someone who is facing so many obstacles can still be so determined in continuing to enjoy life as it is” - Beatrice. Image: Josh Estey/CARE
“I think about struggle, injustice, violence and hunger. I also imagine many children whose lives are dependent on the welfare of their mothers. I then think about how someone who is facing so many obstacles can still be so determined in continuing to enjoy life as it is.” – Madiha
Photo: Josh Estey/CARE

 

“My life is not the same as my mother’s. She was completely dependent on her husband. With education, I can take decisions and earn some small money” - Angelina. Photo: Tom Perry/CARE
“My life is not the same as my mother’s. She was completely dependent on her husband. With education, I can take decisions and earn some small money.” – Zaiah
Photo: Tom Perry/CARE

Donate now to CARE’s Global Emergency Fund.

 *CARE is committed to being a child safe organisation. Names of children have been changed.

1 Comment Leave new

furjacobs@gmail.com May 17 2015 at 01:05

When I read about the life of Sudanese Women I wonder why anyone in Australia ever complains about their life. Even the poor and underpriviledged in Australia have so much compared to countries like Sudan.

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