Tag: Earthquake Tag: Earthquake

Latest news and stories from CARE's work in the field

Latest news and stories from CARE's work in the field

May 8

CARE distributes Australian aid relief supplies in Nepal

By CARE Australia May 8, 2015 0 comments

Two Royal Australian Air Force C17 aircraft landed in Kathmandu, carrying hundreds of tarpaulins, blankets, hygiene kits and water purification tablets. Photo: Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Following the devastation of the magnitude 7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal on 25 April, CARE has now distributed hundreds of relief supplies provided by the Australian Government to families across hardest-hit Gorkha district.

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Apr 27

Nepal Earthquake: They’re scared to go inside

By CARE Australia April 27, 2015 0 comments
People are too scared to go back into their homes after the Nepal Earthquake.

"I believe that the spirit of volunteerism and the eagerness to help each other during crisis has brought the people of this country closer together," says Grishma Raj Aryal. Photo: © Lucy Beck/CARE

After a devastating earthquake hit north-west of Kathmandu on Saturday, CARE Nepal's Communications Officer, Grishma Raj Aryal, recounts the terror of experiencing it firsthand.

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Jan 11

Haiti Earthquake: Two years on

By CARE Australia January 11, 2012 0 comments

Two years since the devastating earthquake which killed more than 220,000 people, Haitians are rebuilding their lives and regaining their confidence with assistance from CARE. CARE has a five-year, $US100 million plan to help Haiti recover. These photos document the past two years of CARE’s work in Haiti, including the initiail…

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Jan 11

Haiti: School’s in

By CARE Australia January 11, 2012 0 comments

By Mildrede Beliard, CARE Haiti Two years after the devastating earthquake in Haiti which killed over 222,000 people, CARE is helping communities to move from the recovery phase and work towards rebuilding their lives and regaining their independence. Léogâne was one of the areas hardest hit by Haiti’s devastating earthquake on 12 January 2010. Officials estimate the tremor destroyed 80 to 90 per cent of Léogâne’s buildings, including many schools. A young girl outside a destroyed building in Leogane in the days after the earthquake in 2012. Image: Evelyn Hockstein/CARE The parents of Léogâne’s Mellier community have a long history of banding together to help one another. In the chaos that enveloped Haiti following the departure of the ruling Duvalier family in 1987, a group of parents in Mellier formed the Association of Parents of Mellier (ASPAM), a PTA-like association to make sure their kids’ schooling continued without interruption. Soon after, they opened a pre-school and an elementary school so their youngest children didn’t have to walk for hours to facilities outside Mellier if they wanted an education. Even in the immediate aftermath of the earthquake, when day-to-day survival was itself in doubt for many, parents began work to get their children back in school. For help, ASPAM turned to CARE, which has supported 78 schools since the earthquake, 20 in Léogâne alone. ‘CARE was with us from the start,’ says Ginette Louis Jean, director of the ASPAM pre-school. ‘CARE provided us with school kits for teachers, students and educational materials for the class.’ An ASPAM school in Leogane where CARE has assited with refurnishing and has distributed school kits to students and teaching materials to teachers. Image: Mildrede Beliard/CARE.

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Apr 14

Japan: Five weeks later and the challenges ahead

By CARE Australia April 14, 2011 0 comments

By Robert Laprade, CARE Emergency Team in Japan These are my last days in Japan. It has been almost five weeks since the tsunami hit the coast of northern Japan; in many areas it was more than 30 metres high. There are still so many humanitarian needs. Even though infrastructure is getting repaired by the government, with roads being cleared, ports functioning again and the lights coming back on, it’s apparent even to those unfamiliar with emergency work that it will take five to ten years to rebuild the area – at least. Survivors living in evacuation centres or with host families face huge challenges. They will not be going back home anytime soon, as many of their houses are now nothing more than a foundation. Others’ homes are partially damaged with windows and doors torn off, filled with a metre of a mixture of mud and miscellaneous smashed rubbish. The initial shock of the disaster has receded – now it is dawning on many people just how bad their situation really is. They realise that they will not be able to live in their homes soon, if ever again. Destroyed house in Yamada city. Photo: CARE/Futab a Kaiharazuk a It’s a huge challenge for the government. In the first weeks, the focus has rightly been on searching for survivors and remains of victims, putting a roof over the affected people as quickly as possible and getting basic infrastructure back up and running. Now the government needs to determine how to house people for a longer period before permanent housing can be built. In the fishing towns of Yamada and Otsuchi and many others, most buildings are destroyed – only the wood, metal siding, beams and contents remain, strewn across the hideous landscape, kilometres from where they once stood as offices, houses and schools. Much of the coastline where the tsunami hit is mountainous. The only flat area is the land lining the coves and inlets wiped almost clean in the disaster.  There’s not much space to build temporary houses for all evacuees.

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